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The Graveyard is a place to pay your respects and visit loved ones, but it also is an open book on the history of the Church and the burial stones dotted around the graveyard. One can trace the historical view of the gravestones in their section according to age, and there are also some notable graves mentioned below.

 

We believe that there are graves above graves as this was common practice to use the land to its best, although we can see that gravestones are being noted from the 1600's.  Burials have been taken place at Childwall Church from as far back as 1557 when records began. The oldest gravestone is believed to be from 1620 and gravestones from the late 1600's can be found with good inscriptions bearing the stories of the past.

 

The graveyard is bounded by a stone wall around its perimeter, and along Childwall Lane, there are three lych-gates. The three lych-gates, the oldest of which dates 1728 are still in use to this day.  

Next to the car park on Score Lane (which was built by the City Council for people to park in the 1930's when visiting Childwall and thus does not belong to the Church or the Childwall Abbey) is the hearse house of which we have gone in to more detail further in to this website.

Burials have been taken place at Childwall Church from as far back as 1557 when records began. The oldest gravestone is believed to be from 1620 and gravestones from the late 1600's can be found with good inscriptions bearing the stories of the past. The graveyard has a steep incline and is probably 2m in depth from the slope from the top to bottom. The graveyard is bounded by a stone wall around its perimeter, and along Childwall Lane, there are three lych-gates. The three lych-gates, the oldest of which dates 1728 are still in use to this day. Next to the car park on Score Lane (which was built by the City Council for people to park in the 1930's when visiting Childwall and thus does not belong to the Church or the Childwall Abbey) is the hearse house of which we have gone in to more detail further in to this website.

 

The adjoining land to the North, known as the Bloody Acre was gifted by the Salisbury Family as an overspill for the graveyard.  I do not believe that each gravestone has been photographed and its inscription fully detailed in modern times, but I have personally photographed over 100 graves from the North side of the graveyard. I am intending to move to the gravestones which are flat and are more difficult to decipher with their inscriptions, yet far older graves can be found with almost perfect inscriptions. The graveyard is a place to go, not just to pay respects, but to review the history of the people who were buried at Childwall, and also that of the layout of the graveyard from the dates on the graves.

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